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What Works in Residential Reentry Centers?

 

This study, through a cooperative agreement with the International Community Corrections Association, focused on residential re-entry centers (RRCs) contracted by the Federal Bureau of Prisons. There are 250 Residential Reentry Center contractors who are responsible for nearly 24,000 federal offenders each year. In this study, the experiences of 9 RRC sites and nearly 40,000 individual case histories were examined with the goal of providing details concerning the services and performance of the RRCs. The results of this project are reported in seven different monographs as well as an executive overview.

 


 

For more information about this project please see the ICCA webpage.

  What are Residential Reentry Centers?  
 

Residential Reentry Centers (RRCs) are designed to facilitate the transition from prison to the community, and many often serve as halfway back facilities for offenders who have difficulties when placed on community supervision. During this transitional period, the RRCs assist offenders in securing housing and employment as well as continuing in appropriate treatment and other programs to address criminogenic needs. The potential value of these centers cannot be overstated given the length of incarceration and the difficulties of reestablishing housing, employment, and stable relationships. Overall, RRCs are relatively rare in the US with less than one percent of the releasee population having access to some type of re-entry facility (Taxman, Perdoni & Harrison, 2007).

 
 

Research Questions

 
 

For this project, the aim was to address the following questions about RRCs:

 

• Does performance contracting stimulate contractors to develop evidence-based practices, provide better treatment services or become more efficient?
• What types of offenders are released into communities—to the streets, to residential centers, through home confinement or a mix of all of these?
• What happens to individuals who are transitioned through halfway houses or residential reentry centers?
• Does RRC monitoring, case management or treatment reduce the risk of future criminal conduct?
• How should other nonresidential transitional services and monitoring such as home confinement be used?
• What types of services motivate former inmates to live crime free?
• Are Residential Reentry Centers (RRC) geared to provide services that reduce risk of future crimes?
• How do RRCs know if they are successful in attaining their goals?
• What motivates and inspires some contractors to achieve results that improve outcomes?

 
  Findings Monographs  
 

Taxman, F.S. (2010). Executive Overview: What Works in Residential Reentry Centers. What Works in Residential Reentry Centers, 8.
Shilton, M., Rexroat, J., Taxman, F.S., & Mericle, A. (2010). Report 1: What is the impact of “Performance Contracting” on offender supervision services? What Works in Residential Reentry Centers.


Mericle, A., Shilton, M., Taxman, F.S., & Rexroat, J. (2010). Report 2: Measuring Performance- The Capacity of Residential Reentry Centers (RRCs) to Collect, Manage, and Analyze Client-Level Data. What Works in Residential Reentry Centers.


Shilton, M., Rexroat, J., Taxman, F.S., & Mericle, A. (2010). Report 3: What organizational factors are related to improved outcomes? What Works in Residential Reentry Centers.


Rexroat, J., Shilton, M., Taxman, F.S., & Mericle, A. (2010). Report 4: How do staff hiring, retention, management and attitudes affect organizational climate and performance in RRCs? What Works in Residential Reentry Centers.


Shilton, M., Rexroat, J., Taxman, F.S., & Mericle, A. (2010. Report 5: What services are provided by RRCs? What Works in Residential Reentry Centers.


Lerch, J., Taxman, F.S., & Mericle, A. (2010). Report 6: Technical Violation Rates and Rearrest Rates on Federal Probation after Release from an RRC. What Works in Residential Reentry Centers.


Shilton, M., Rexroat, J., Taxman, F.S., & Mericle, A. (2010). Report 7: Site Visits. What Works in Residential Reentry Centers.

 

 
  Contact Information  
 
Jennifer Lerch
Research Associate

Phone: 703-993-8315
E-mail: jlerch@gmu.edu
 

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